Eye Examinations

Reviewed by Jill E. Bixler, M.D.

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Regular eye examinations are important for children and adults because the eyes can be good indicators of overall health. Like many other health conditions, eye conditions can be treated if detected early.

It is important to allow enough time in your schedule for a thorough eye examination. Typically, these can take 1 to 2 hours but may be longer if you require special testing.

Eye Exams for Children

  • Infants by 6 months of age should be examined by an ophthalmologist or pediatrician
  • Children (ages 1 - 18) should have their eyes examined every 2 to 4 years
  • High-risk children may require more frequent examinations and eye care treatment to help prevent the progression of an eye disease

High-Risk Children include:

  • Prematurity: birth weight less than 1,250 grams
  • Family history of congenital eye conditions (cataract, retinoblastoma, strabismus, or amblyopia)
  • Maternal intrauterine, cervicovaginal infection, or substance abuse
  • Systemic condition that may be vision threatening (Marfan Syndrome)

Eye Exams for Adults

Adult eye examinations should be performed on a regular basis.

  • Young adults (ages 20 to 49) should have their eyes examined every 3 to 5 years
  • Older adults ages (ages 40 to 64) should have their eyes examined 2 to 4 years
  • Seniors (65 years of age or older) should have their eyes examined every 1 to 2 years
  • High-risk adults may require more frequent examinations and eye care treatment to help prevent the progression of an eye disease

High-Risk Adults include:

  • People with diabetes
  • People with glaucoma or a strong family history of glaucoma
  • People with AIDS/HIV
  • People who take medications that can cause toxicity to the eye (Hydroxychloroquine)

Clinic Information

For more information, see the Comprehensive Ophthalmology and Cataract Sugery Clinic and the complete Clinic Services listing of the U-M Kellogg Eye Center.

Last Modified: Thursday, 06-Feb-2014 11:16:06 EST